Insurance Coverage and COVID-19



Do I have to pay to get a coronavirus test?

The Families First Coronavirus Act required that all private insurance plans cover coronavirus testing without deductibles, coinsurance, or co-pays. That bill also prohibited plans from using tools like prior authorization to limit access to testing. Insurers also have to cover fees for visits to the ER, an urgent care center, or a doctor’s office associated with getting a test without cost sharing.

Will I have to pay for a coronavirus vaccine when one becomes available?

No. The Families First Coronavirus Response Act ensures that all individuals, including those with private insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, CHIP, VA, FEHBP, and TRICARE, as well as the uninsured, will not be charged out of pocket for coronavirus testing. This law also prohibits plans from using tools like prior authorization to limit access to testing. Insurers also have to cover fees for visits to the ER, an urgent care center, or a doctor’s office associated with getting a test without cost sharing.

 

I lost my job because of coronavirus and I had employer-sponsored health insurance. What are my options?

If you lost your job and had employer-sponsored health coverage, you qualify for a 60-day special enrollment period to enroll in a new insurance plan on the health insurance exchange. You may also qualify for tax credits to assist with affording health insurance through the exchange. You can determine what assistance you qualify for here and see available health plan options here.

You may be offered COBRA continuation coverage by your former employer. This will allow you to keep your current coverage, but requires that you pay all costs, including the amount your former employer had been paying. Click here for more information on COBRA.

If your income is less than $16,000 for a single person or $33,000 for a family of four, you may qualify for the Healthy Michigan Plan or traditional Medicaid. To see if you are eligible for these programs, apply here.

If you’re under 26, you may be able to be added to a parent’s coverage. If you are married and your spouse has an offer of health insurance coverage through their employer, your spouse may also be able to add you to their coverage.

Consumers should contact the Michigan Department of Insurance Financial Services toll free at 877-999-6442 if they need assistance. The Michigan Health Insurance Consumer Assistance Program (HICAP) can provide shopping tips and help answer questions about health insurance or Special Enrollment Periods. 

 

I have private insurance. Will I get billed for coronavirus treatments if my family or I get sick?

Many private insurance companies have waived out of pocket payments for coronavirus-related treatments. Check with your insurance provider to see what services and payments they have waived.

 

Are short-term plans a good option? I might only be out of work temporarily.

No. Short-term plans usually do not provide comprehensive coverage, and could lead to high bills if you need to be treated for coronavirus or any other serious illness or injury. Verify the plan you’re enrolling in covers the essential health benefits that the Affordable Care Act requires.